From aerial views, the Great Blue Hole of Belize is exactly that – a massive, circular abyss of sapphire water. Considered to be a “bucket-list” item of Belize, the Great Blue Hole is an ancient sinkhole made by the collapse of a cavern tens of thousands of years ago. The hole is 984 feet across and 410 feet deep – a football field (360 feet) seems minuscule in comparison. It was made famous by Jacques Cousteau in the 1960’s, who dubbed it one of the top ten diving places in the world and it’s easy to see why.

Visitors from all over the world are drawn to the mysterious hole because of what lays below in the azure waters. The blue hole offers a look into the Earth’s history. Diving deeper and deeper underwater reveals gigantic limestone stalactites and stalagmites, eerily reminiscent of Gothic architecture. Scientists believe these were formed when the cavern was still above sea level during the last glacial period.

Intricate passageways are formed by the columns and wildlife can often be seen flitting throughout. Don’t be surprised if you encounter hammerhead or black tip tiger sharks – they encompass just a fraction of the rich marine life. Purple sea fans, grouper fish, midnight parrot fish and neon gobies all frequent the hole.

The Great Blue Hole lures people to its blue waters and is a must see if you are visiting Belize.

Interested in visiting Belize? We offer a variety of exciting, eco-friendly trips that are big on adventure and low on impact. Give us a call at (928) 526-4575 and we’ll help you find your best Belizean adventure.

Photos: Belize Hub, Newsner