Mount Fairweather is said to be one of the worst-named but most beautiful mountains on Earth. Dramatically rising 15,300 feet out of Glacier Bay, the peak is the perfect example of the beautiful and stark wilderness of Alaska and British Columbia. In native Tlingit culture, it is believed that Mount Fairweather and the neighboring Mount Saint Elias were once joined in marriage but separated and journeyed into opposite directions after a fight. The mountains between the two peaks are believed to be their children.

Though its name may conjure thoughts of mild weather, Mount Fairweather is home to unpredictable snowstorms and frigid temperatures in the winter time. In the summer months, when the weather is calmer, the peak can be seen rising out of the Pacific waters, acting as a jagged and majestic gateway into raw wilderness.

The peak has beckoned explorers for years. It was first summited in 1931 by mountaineering pioneers Allen Carpe and Terris Moore. Carpe would later describe the ascent as one of the most difficult he ever encountered, but also as one of the most beautiful untouched places he had seen. Mount Fairweather has summoned climbers and explorers from around the world who wish to experience the mysterious beauty of its wild nature.

Photo: Worldwide Elevation Finder


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